Green Revolution in India

Green Revolution in India

The introduction of high-yielding varieties of seeds and the increased use of fertilizers and irrigation are known collectively as the Green Revolution, which provided the increase in production needed to make India self-sufficient in food grains, thus improving agriculture in India. Genetically modified high-yielding wheat was first introduced to India in 1963 by Dr. Norman Borlaug. Borlaug has been hailed as the Father of the Green Revolution. The methods adopted included the use of high yielding varieties(HYV) of seeds.

The production of wheat has produced the best results in fueling self-sufficiency of India. Along with high yielding seeds and irrigation facilities, the enthusiasm of farmers mobilized the idea of agricultural revolution and is also credited to M. S. Swaminathan and his team had contributed towards the success of green revolution. Due to the rise in use of chemical pesticides and fertilizers there were many negative effects on the soil and the land such as land degradation.

The following measures were adopted:

  • Use of high yielding varieties (HYV) of seeds
  • Irrigation
  • Use of insecticides and pesticides
  • Consolidation of holdings
  • Land reforms
  • Rural electrification
  • Improved rural infrastructure
  • Supply of agricultural credit
  • Use of (chemical) fertilizers
  • Opening of agriculture universities
  • Higher incomes were yielded
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